Jingles All the Way

Jingles All the WayFew things have quite the lasting impression as commercial jingles. 

Quick, recite the Preamble to the Constitution. . .  Now without Googling them, name the books of the Old Testament in order. . .  Okay, how far can you get in the periodic table of elements?  Would an earworm help?

How did you do?  Probably better than I.  But I’ll bet all of us can ace the “Slinky Song.”  Everyone 35 and older can probably sing the “My Buddy” jingle by heart.  And do any of us even remember that “Like a Rock” actually played on the radio before it sold Chevy trucks?

Nowadays, a new pop or country song makes its way to a national commercial before it even hits the radio.  Keeping up with today’s music is as easy as watching prime time television.  What used to be considered a song’s last stop, its last chance for resuscitation, its performer’s walk of Shame, I Need the Money, is now its debu-taint ball, its informal presentation of new money to impolite society.  (Don’t mind her, she’s just jealous.)

You’ve read the news, “It Takes an Earworm to Learn the Periodic Table.”  Maybe a jingle is nothing more than a glorified earworm.  But did you notice, the tune used as an aid to learn the periodic table is from The Pirates of Penzance?  Gilbert and Sullivan – the team celebrated at any given Ivy League school – have been reduced to earworm status.

Want to learn the elements in order?  Try using Offenbach’s can-can music “Infernal Galop.”  He’s been reduced too.

To tell the truth, I have an affection and respect for good jingle writers.  I tip my hat to the writer(s) of the Empire Today commercial jingle.  When I have the funds together, not only will I be able to call for an estimate on replacing my floors without cracking open a phone book (yes, I have one) or waking up my computer, but I’ll be able to do it in three-part harmony.  And you know what a sucker I am for harmony.

No sir, a glorified earworm a jingle is not.  A good song is a good song.  Whether or not you have any experience with roasting a chestnut over an open fire, when the great Nat King Cole sings the first line of that song you see the glow, you hear the crackle, you feel Christmas.  Whether or not you’ve ever been to a cabaret, when you hear Offenbach’s “Can-Can” you see high kicks, petticoats, and perhaps the periodic table.  And right or wrong, when I hear “I’d like to teach the world to sing in perfect harmony,” I taste a cold Coke – from a bottle of course – and I feel hopeful that not only will that bottle be recycled, but maybe we will all metaphorically sing in harmony one day.  And hey, if it turns out to be literal I won’t be disappointed.

Using art to sell stuff may be the world’s actual oldest profession.  After all, it was the music of a piano player or player piano that first lured a customer to a brothel.  (I’ll bet Offenbach’s music was featured there too.)  Before pianos, they probably just whistled or banged rocks together.  The bottom line is that a good product needs a good song.  But a good song does not necessarily need the product.

This Christmas there are several jingles that I feel could stand alone – even without the product to which they’ve been attached.

GLADE:  “Let There Be Peace on Earth”

This song by Kevin Ross is a beauty, as is his voice.  Searching for it on iTunes after I’m done with this post. . .

Vistaprint:  “I Just Wanted You to Know”

Here’s the full version of David Law’s song.  The holidays do seem to be the perfect time to tell people how much they mean to you.

Big Lots:  “Nailing This”

I don’t know who sings this but – you guessed it – she nails it!  Just try to keep me from singing this into a hairbrush.

Walmart:  “Christmas Cheer”

I’m all in for the “more carols … hugs … spirit … and joy” parts of this song.

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Shutterfly:  “Mail Myself to You”

No more “Dust Bowl Blues” for Woodie Guthrie’s family.  Hearing this little girl sing his song probably makes them verklempt too.

Happy Holidays!

- Anita, Noted in Nashville

We Gather Together

My computer works.

Not a particularly noteworthy announcement from a blogger, I know.  But being without my computer for weeks makes these words sing off the screen with all the vibrato of a Wagnerian soprano.  Sing it with me, “Maaaai com-pu-tor wo-(trilled r)-ks-ah!”

With more crashing fatigue than its user, my machine refused to stay awake for more than a few minutes at a time until finally deciding to take a two-month-long nap.  I don’t know what woke it from its slumber, but it seems to be up to working 85 – 90 % of the time now.  I’ll type fast just to be safe.

I’ve had these few months to consider the tortures virus writers should endure.  I naturally find cruel and unusual punishment abhorrent, but my recent fantasies have included images of stripping said offenders naked in public where they’re met by Lorenzo Lamas and a laser pointer, Charlie Sheen and an Epilady Classic, and Joey Lawrence and over-the-counter cans of spray tan.  Although I can’t be certain it was a virus that caused the trouble, it still seems good policy.

Anyway, I’m happy to get to post something before Thanksgiving arrives.  Fingers crossed, I’ll be back with more after my tryptophan-induced holiday rest.  I hope you enjoy my new arrangement of “We Gather Together.”

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

- Anita, Noted in Nashville

You’re Not ‘The One That Got Away’

Well, hello there!  It’s been a while.  I’ve enjoyed catching up on your blogs this week.  Thank you for making me feel missed and welcomed back.

There are many, many songs written about “the one that got away.”  But what about the one that didn’t?  And by that I mean, what about the one that didn’t, but you wish had?!  Here’s a song I wrote on that subject a few years ago.

My inner grammar cop compels me to point out the flaw in the title.  But no one says, “the one who got away” now do they?  So artistic license wins over language laws this time – like a lot of times.  In fact, anytime you find an error in my writing, just chalk it up to “artistic license.”  Oh yeah, I totally meant to do that. . .

Have a great weekend!

- Anita, Noted in Nashville

Taking a Beat . . . or 2 . . . or 12

Well . . . that was certainly an abrupt break from the blog!  I’m sorry to have left some of your comments hanging, for leaving some blog awards unanswered, and for disappearing from your posts without a word.

Big D and I welcomed some unexpected opportunities and surprising changes.  All good.  But the blog had to take an immediate back seat, and a flight out the proverbial window soon followed – leaving my blogging manners to twist in the spring breeze.

I think of you all often, and I look forward to catching up with all of your blogs in August.  Now . . . it’s time to take that summer break I planned all along.  :)

Have a great summer!

- Anita, Noted in Nashville

Fear Itself: Awareness, Part III

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Part III Catch up on Fear Itself: Awareness, Part II here. A wise man once told me, “Aware people are happy people.”  I have questioned the authenticity of this pearl from time to time – especially at the height of … Continue reading

Irish Soda Bread Success

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Happy Saint Patrick’s Day! I am a wee bit o’ Irish.  I’ve always thought that wee bit was my funny bone.  But the only proof I have is that I find Conan O’Brien’s self-deprecating humor hilarious.  Using that logic, I’m … Continue reading

Fear Itself: Awareness, Part II

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aware – knowing that something (such as a situation, condition, or problem) exists feeling, experiencing, or noticing something (such as a sound, sensation, or emotion) knowing and understanding a lot about what is happening in the world or around you … Continue reading

Fear Itself: Awareness, Part I

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I wasn’t always afraid to sing or perform in front of others, of course.  Phobias aren’t delivered when we are.  “Congratulations!  It’s a girl . . . with Friggatriskaidekaphobia, Social Anxiety Disorder, and Ablutophobia, so good luck with her first … Continue reading